Career and Technical Education

Trades and Technology Department Mission Statement:


Work Safe, Work Smart. Learn Today, Earn Tomorrow.

Course #

Description

Required or Elective

Other Information


603

Technology Exploration

Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course involves the daily exposure of various modules that allow students the opportunity to learn about such areas as Meteorology, Digital Music, Graphic Design, Digital Design, Web page Design, Computer Animation, Health and Fitness, 3D Modeling, Horticulture, Engineering Structures, Electronics, Residential Wiring, and Residential Plumbing. Students will have the opportunity to be exposed to a minimum of eight modules within the semester. This self-directed curriculum, with an emphasis on cooperative learning, allows students to develop a range of real-world skills including reading, math, science, problem-solving, critical thinking, and decision-making in a format that is very enjoyable, rewarding, and applicable to life.

630

Introduction to Agricultural Industry

Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, and agricultural mechanics, will be presented. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

631

Horticulture Production & Management

Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course is designed to introduce students to the horticulture industry and provide them with basic plant science knowledge that can be further developed in advanced horticulture courses. Major units of instruction include horticulture research, horticultural careers, plant anatomy, seed germination, plant propagation, growing media, pest management, hydroponics, identifying horticultural plants, growing greenhouse crops, and floral design. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

632

Greenhouse Production & Floral Design

Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course focuses on the greenhouse management, floral design, and related segments of the horticulture industry. Major units of study include floriculture plant identification, greenhouse structures, and the culture of greenhouse crops. Also included are care and handling of cut flowers, principles of art applied to floral design, and the mechanics of floral design. Agribusiness units will be introduced in merchandising, advertising, sales, and operating a retail floral business. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects are integral course components for leadership development, career exploration, and reinforcement of academic concepts.

633

Plant Science

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 630, active FFA membership, and SAE

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 630 with a "C" or better average


This course is designed to reinforce and extend students' understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of plant growth and management in agriculture, and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions. Topics of study are in the areas of initiating plant growth - germination, plant sensory mechanisms, enzyme action, absorption, and managing plant growth - photosynthesis, respiration, translocation, metabolism, and growth regulation. The course will be valuable prepartion for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects are integral course components for leadership development, career exploration, and reinforcement of academic concepts.

635

Animal Science

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 630, active FFA membership, and SAE

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 630 with a "C" or better average


This course is designed to reinforce and extend students' understanding of science by associating scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of animal agriculture and specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in the animal industry. Topics of study are in the areas of growth and development of animals - embryology, ethology, nutrition, immunity systems, and processing animal products - preservation, fermentation, and pasteurization. The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects are integral course components for leadership development, career exploration, and reinforcement of academic concepts.

636

Agri-Business Management

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 630, active FFA membership, and SAE

Year


Recommendation: A passing grade in 630 with a "C" or better average


This course will provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to manage personal finances and develop into a successful entrepreneur and/or businessperson. Instructional units include: business ownership types, starting an agribusiness, managing and operating an agribusiness, financing an agribusiness, managing personal finances, record keeping and financial management of an agribusiness, local, state, and federal taxes, agricultural law, and developing employability skills. Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

642

Introduction to Metalworking

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course introduces students to the skills common to many occupations, such as applying safety practices, selecting materials, performing bench work operations, performing precision measurement, and operating a variety of tools. Students will learn how to machine parts to print using metal lathes and vertical milling machines. Students will learn how trades mirror one another. The course fee will depend on the materials used.

644

Advanced Metalworking

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 642

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 642 with a "C" or better average


This course offers experiences that expand on competencies achieved during Introduction to Metalworking. This course will begin to offer students the opportunity to specialize in specific areas of manufacturing such as machine tool set-up and operation and metal fabrication. Course content will include the following: machine tool set-up, cold metal fabrication, performing supervisory functions, and maintenance and repair of machinery. The course fee will depend on the materials used. Dual credit through Southwestern Illinois College available.

646

Introduction to Welding

 Elective

$20 Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course enables students to gain knowledge of the properties, uses, and applications of various metals, skills in processes used to join and cut metals (such as oxyacetylene, shielded metal arc welding, and metal inert gas. Students will learn the basics of welding in the flat position, with a strong emphasis on shop safety. This course also includes instruction in interpreting blueprints or other types of specifications.

648

Advanced Welding

 Elective

$35 Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 646

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 646 with a "C" or better average


This course assists students in gaining the knowledge and developing the basic skills needed to be successful in welding technology. Units of instruction include Arc, TIG and MIG welding, cutting metal using arc, plasma, and oxy-gas. In addition, students learn blueprint reading, precision measuring, layout, and production process planning. This course builds on the skills and concepts introduced in intro to welding and provides more in-depth skill development in various types of welding including horizontal, vertical, overhead, and circular techniques. There will be a $35 lab fee.

650

Introduction to Woodworking

 Elective

$10 Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


Introduction to woodworking is an overview to the field of wood technology. This is an excellent foundation course for a career in woodworking or construction. It is designed to instruct students in the areas of reading project drawings, knowledge of woods and uses, calculations of materials, numerous joinery designs and project procedures. A major emphasis will be placed on shop safety, proper hand and power tool usage and wood processes. This course provides students with an in-depth introduction to the woodshop and the student will gain practical knowledge needed to work on their own projects or continue on with lifelong skills in woodworking and construction. This class emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision making, and time management skills. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing vocabulary, blue print reading and science are integrated throughout the curriculum. Students will construct various teacher assigned projects.

656

Advanced Carpentry

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 650

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 650 with a "C" or better average


This course will give students insight into constructing a building. Math is essential in figuring the building's square area, linear feet, cubic yards, board feet and materials list. The math skills needed include addition, subtraction, division and multiplication. Drafting skills will be taught and used. Blue prints will be made of the building with the student participating in the design and structure of the building. Parts of the building will be discussed and explained. Students will be able to recognize different parts of a house. Building codes will be stressed throughout the course and safety will be practiced at all times.

658

Advanced Woodworking

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completeion of 650

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 650 with a "C" or better average


This course is designed to provide students with the experience and skills in repair and maintenance of machinery, basic carpentry, refinishing/repair of furniture, drywalling, painting, minor electrical repairs, and maintaining plumbing systems. Through these experiences the student is provided the opportunity to become knowledgeable in a variety of practices and skills associated with all trades necessary to maintain a buildings daily operations that are repair related.Instruction includes safety principles and practices. Recognition of standard lumber sizes, estimating materials, building concepts and procedures, local-state-national building codes, and blue-print reading. This class emphasizes teamwork, career awareness, decision-making, and time management skills. All learning experiences are designed to allow students to acquire entry-level job skills and knowledge. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing, vocabulary, blue-print reading and science are integrated throughout the curriculum.

662

Small Engine Technology

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This course is designed to introduce the student to the design and construction of the various piston-type (reciprocating) internal combustion engines. This covers theory of operation, maintenance and overhaul for four-stroke and two-stroke engines utilizing various types of fuel. Planned activities will allow the student to become knowledgeable of the fundamental principles and technical skills related to troubleshooting, repairing, identifying parts and making precision measurements. Laboratory experiences include the disassembly, inspection, measurement, testing and reassembly of small piston engines. The student is required to participate in two laboratory projects. Students will be required to supply the parts necessary for completion of any of their own personal engine overhaul projects. Safety will be a key component of this class. Students will also be exposed to career opportunities related to small engines.

664

Introduction to Automotive Technology

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 662

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 662 with a "C" or better average


This course is designed to introduce the student to the occupational area of Automotive/Diesel Technician. It is a course for the potential technician as well as the potential car owner. The major emphasis will be on general shop practice, shop and equipment safety, tools and equipment, general automobile service/maintenance and engine repair. The Introduction to Automotive Technology course will introduce students to the various mechanical systems in automobiles and provide basic experience in maintenance tasks. This course may also cover career opportunities in the automotive, diesel and/or transportation fields. Laboratory experiences include general lubricating service, cooling system service, fuel system service, ignition system service, cylinder head/engine repair, general shop practice, and other areas of automobile maintenance. Students are highly encouraged to wear safety toe shoes or boots.

666

Automotive Tune-Up

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 664; a valid driver's license

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 662 and 664 with a "C" or better average


This is a one semester course designed to prepare the student in various skills necessary to enter the occupational field of Automobile/Diesel Technician. It is a course for the serious automobile enthusiast as well as the potential automobile technician. Students will be introduced to the skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline and other alternative fuels/energy. Instructional units include engine performance and drivability, electrical systems, integrated computer systems, fuel and injection systems, exhaust and emission systems. Laboratory experiences will concentrate on application and use of testing equipment, diagnosis of engine and other electrical systems, and drivability. Other suggested courses for the potential Automobile/Diesel Technician include Introduction to Welding, Introduction to Metalworking and Introduction to Drafting. Students are highly encouraged to wear safety toe shoes or boots.

668

Automotive Service

 Elective

Lab Fee


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 664; a valid driver's license

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 662 and 664 with a "C" or better average


This is a one-semester course designed to prepare the student in various skills necessary to enter the occupational field of Automobile/Diesel Technician. It is a course for the serious automobile enthusiast as well as the potential automobile technician. Students will be introduced to the skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline and other alternative fuels/energy. The major emphasis will be on maintenance, troubleshooting, service and repair of various drive train components. Wheel alignment, brake service, suspension service, steering systems, bearing service, wheels and tires, tire balancing, engines, transmission, as well as heating and air conditioning service and repair will be presented. Other suggested courses but not required for the potential Automobile/Diesel Technician include Introduction to Welding, Introduction to Metalworking, Introduction to Electricity and Electronics and Introduction to Drafting. Students are highly encouraged to wear safety toe shoes or boots.

670

Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

 Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


This lecture/lab course is an introduction to electricity and solid-state electronics concepts including electrical energy and power, magnetism, direct and alternating current, semiconductors, power supplies, and amplifiers. Opportunities will be provided to apply concepts and skills through the solution of practical problems requiring the design and construction of analog electronic circuits and devices.

686

Introduction to Drafting

Elective


Prerequisite: Entry Level

Semester


Recommendation: None


Design Drafting is a one semester course designed to acquaint students with a pictorial language used throughout the industry. The course teaches drafting fundamentals and provides hands-on experience for developing drafting skills and techniques. It is designed to provide the student with a background in basic mechanical and technical drawing. This course helps students develop problem-solving ability, interpret the ideas of others, and express themselves visually in understandable manner. Drafting provides a wide range of skills that are transferable to many aspects of everyday life. Emphasis is on the basic use of traditional drafting equipment and the understanding of design/drafting principles as they apply, but are not limited to, future pursuits in the architectural and engineering career field.

690

3D Drafting

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 686

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 686 with a "C" or better average


This course explores the three-dimensional construction and viewing capabilities of AutoCAD. Topics covered include a review of point coordinate entry and the user coordinate system (UCS). Spherical and cylindrical coordinate entry, 3D viewing and display techniques, and construction of 3D solid primitives, 2D regions, solid modeling composites, surface models, and 3D mesh models are also introduced. Other topics covered include creating multiple viewports for 3D constructions and creating drawing views for model documentation purposes. Visual styles and rendering are also discussed.

692

Civil Engineering Drafting

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 686

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 686 with a "C" or better average


Engineering Fundamentals provides high school students with a complete introduction to the field of engineering. The textbook begins with an extensive, five-chapter introduction to the engineering design process. This section is followed by nine chapters focused on engineering disciplines. Each of these chapters describes the specific engineering career, its educational requirements, some of the basic math and science principles applicable to the discipline, and examples of real-world engineering projects. This is a double-period course and is offered every other year.

694

Architectural Drafting

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 686

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 686 with a "C" or better average


This course is a continuation of 3D Drafting/CAD with an emphasis on architectural drafting techniques. Students will work with residential plans. The type of plans drawn will include floor plans, wall sections, elevations, details, perspectives, electrical plans, plot plans and presentation plans. Design considerations, materials used, and construction methods will also be included as part of the content. Drawings will be done using both standard and computer drafting techniques. This is a double-period course and is offered every other year.

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