Social Studies

Social Studies Department Mission Statement:


The Jacksonville High School Social Studies department's mission is to help influence our students to be knowledgeable about America's history and the world we live in as well as our role in it. It is our mission to help create people with the skills that will enable them to think critically and be responsible and participating citizens in our democratic system.

A Note about the United States Constitution Test - Graduation Requirement

Successful completion of the Constitution Test is a state requirement for graduation. The Constitution test consists of 100 multiple choice and true/false questions. A student must receive a score of 76 percent or higher to receive a passing grade. The test covers the United States Constitution along with the state of Illinois Constitution. It examines the three branches of government at the federal and state levels, the 27 federal amendments, and the qualifications to hold offices at both the federal and state levels. Courses which prepare students for success on the Constitution Test are labeled "Constitution Prep."

Course #

Description

Required or Elective

Other Information


404

World Cultures and Geography

Fulfills Requirement

Co-Taught Option


Prerequisite: Entry Level; Required course for freshmen

Year


Recommendation: None


World Geography is a regional approach to studying the world. Still, in the course of the year we address some of the most basic tendencies of all people: curiosity, a concern for the challenges and opportunities in the world, a general understanding of the very stories that flood our newspapers, televisions, and computer screens each day. Students may expect to study the various cultures of the world, as well as consider the spatial patterns and their possible meanings through the use of Geographic Information Systems. We also work very hard to develop habits of mind that will work for the remainder of your life as a learner. Nearly all assignments are completed within the confines of the classroom. Students are expected to improve reading habits, organization, and test performance.

406

World Cultures and Geography

Fulfills Requirement


Prerequisite: Entry Level; Required course for freshmen

Year


Recommendation: None


World Geography is a regional approach to studying the world. Still, in the course of the year we address some of the most basic tendencies of all people: curiosity, a concern for the challenges and opportunities in the world, a general understanding of the very stories that flood our newspapers, televisions, and computer screens each day. Students may expect to study the various cultures of the world, as well as consider the spatial patterns and their possible meanings through the use of Geographic Information Systems. We also work very hard to develop habits of mind that will work for the remainder of your life as a learner. Above average homework is assigned and completed outside of the classroom. Students are expected to be capable readers, well organized, and self-starters.

416

World History

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 404/406; Open to Sophomores through Seniors only

Year


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 with a "C" or better average


World History is emphasized rather than western civilization as an essential part of students' basic curriculum. This is due to the recognition of the rapid increase in political, economic, and cultural interrelationships around the world. Our main source of content will address this story through the lens of two great themes: tradition and encounters. The theme of tradition draws attention to the formation, maintenance, and sometime collapse of individual societies. Some traditions arose and disappeared relatively quickly, while others influenced human affairs over the course of time. In the process, a pattern of interaction and exchange will also emerge. Classroom activities are built around reading analysis, class discussions, writing assignments, and lectures.

418

AP World History

 Elective

AP Credit


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 404/406; Open to Sophomores through Seniors only

Year


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 with a "B" or better average


World History is emphasized rather than western civilization as an essential part of students' basic curriculum. This is due to the recognition of the rapid increase in political, economic, and cultural interrelationships around the world. Our main source of content will address this story through the lens of two great themes: tradition and encounters. The theme of tradition draws attention to the formation, maintenance, and sometime collapse of individual societies. Some traditions arose and disappeared relatively quickly, while others influenced human affairs over the course of time. In the process, a pattern of interaction and exchange will also emerge. Classroom activities are built around reading analysis, class discussions, lengthy writing assignments, and lectures. Significant amounts of supplementary reading material will be assigned throughout the year. In addition to a higher education textbook, students will read a book of historical fiction, complete multiple document based questions, and a collection of primary sources. This is an intensive writing course.

424

United States History

Fulfills Requirement

Co-Taught Option


* Constitution Prep

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in 404/406; Open to Juniors and Seniors only

Year


Recommendation: None


United States History 424 is a year-long general survey course that begins with the arrival of the first Americans and continues to the present day. The course covers major themes and eras of American History such as the American Colonies, Independence and the New Nation, Western Expansion, the Civil War, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Movement, the Roaring Twenties, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and Modern America. After completion of the course, students should have a basic knowledge of the people, events, and themes that trace the history of the United States as well as an understanding of the economic, military, political and social development of the United States. Note taking, focus on audio-visual materials, completion of homework assignments, success on unit tests, and other classroom projects are required for successful completion of this course.

426

United States History

Fulfills Requirement


* Constitution Prep

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in 404/406; Open to Juniors to Seniors only

Year


Recommendation: None


United States History 426 is a year-long general survey course that begins with the arrival of the first Americans and continues to the present day. The course covers major themes and eras of American History such as the American Colonies, Independence and the New Nation, Western Expansion, the Civil War, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Movement, the Roaring Twenties, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and Modern America. After completion of the course, students should have a basic knowledge of the people, events, and themes that trace the history of the United States as well as an understanding of the economic, military, political and social development of the United States. This course is more writing-intensive than the 424 course. Students must be able to express their ideas in writing with supporting evidence as essay questions make up a large portion of the unit tests. Note taking, focus on audio-visual materials, completion of homework assignments, success on unit tests, and other classroom projects are required for successful completion of this course.

428

AP United States History

Fulfills Requirement

AP Credit


* Constitution Prep

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 404/406 and 416/418; Open to Juniors and Seniors only

Year


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 and 416/418 with a "C" or better average


AP United States History 428 is a year-long survey course that begins with the arrival of the first Americans and continues to the present day. The course covers major themes and eras of American History such as the American Colonies, Independence and the New Nation, Western Expansion, the Civil War, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Movement, the Roaring Twenties, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and Modern America. After completion of the course, students should have a knowledge of the people, events, and themes that trace the history of the United States as well as an understanding of the economic, military, political, and social development of the United States. This course is writing-intensive and students must be able to express their ideas in writing with supporting evidence as document based questions and test essay questions will make up a large portion of the grade. Students will be expected to do a large amount of outside reading and writing to be successful in the class.

434

Psychology

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 404/406; Open to Juniors and Seniors only

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 with a "C" or better average


The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to several areas of psychology and approaches to the study of individual development and behavior. The topics covered on an introductory level include learning, motivation, needs, emotions, perceptions, individual differences, environment, intelligence, personality theories, and personality disorders.

 436 Civics  Elective

Prerequisite: Required course to be taken in the junior or senior year.

Semester


Civics 436 is a semester course that will emphasize the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will prepare young people to be competent and responsible citizens throughout their lives. The course will focus on the major themes of government such as the United States Constitution, civil liberties, citizenship, voting, state and local government, foundations of government, different political systems, and the government and economy. Finally, the course will focus on the discussion of current and controversial issues, service learning, and simulations of the democratic process. The Constitution test for graduation will be administered in this class. For successful completion of the course, students will be required to do a lot of reading and writing for the course and be able to debate issues while maintaining a civil attitude towards differing viewpoints.

444

American History Through Film

Elective


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 404/406, and completion or concurrent enrollment in 424/426; Open to Juniors and Seniors only

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 with a "C" or better average


American History Through Film is a college-style elective course that studies American History through Hollywood movies. The course allows students to experience areas of American History that do not receive major focus in the required American History classes or allows more focus on certain topics in American History. It also teaches the students to critically analyze the truthfulness of movie media sources that can be applied to all media and internet areas. The American West, labor relations, war, pop culture, civil rights, sports, Vietnam, and current issues are a few of the possible topics covered in the class. In order to be successful in the class, students will discuss the class movies both orally and in writing, complete research assignments, and critically analyze and review the movies. Note: This course does not meet NCAA requirements.

454

Geographic Information Systems

Elective



Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in 404/406; Open to Sophomores through Seniors only

Semester


Recommendation: A passing grade in 404/406 with a "C" or better average


GIS utilizes a Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool to understand and apply geographic principles. After a general introduction to the software and mapping issues, students will work individually and in small groups to construct geographic questions, acquire and analyze data, construct maps, and interpret spatial information related to their own carefully researched proposals. Using real-world case studies and hands-on software exercises, students will discover the geographic tools allowing investigation and possibly even solutions to problems in their own communities. This course is open to 10-12th grade students who have comfort working inside and outside of the classroom setting.

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