Syllabus/Expectations

Welcome to English 116.

 

Course Overview:  Expanding on the elements of freshman English, this course will help students develop skills focusing on composition, editing, and grammar. Writing strategies will be reinfoced through the examination of various reading materials, ranging from classic to contemporary selections as well as informational texts. The readings for this course will concentrate on interactions among society, community, and the individual, focusing on various cultures in the United States and from around the world, giving students a means of comparing and apprciating the feelings and thoughts of people in their communities and in other countries.

 

Big Ideas: Throughout the year students in English 116 classes will:

 

  • Incorporate and cite strong textual evidence to support analysis of text.
  • Study and practice elements of creative expression in order to recognize it in literature and add sophistication to their writing.
  • Explore world history in order to identify and understand the connection between culture/history in literature.
  • Recognize the components of character in order to better understand character development in literature.
  • Employ a variety of reading strategies and techniques in order to improve fluency and comprehension.
  • Engage in small group and partner activities to effectively build on others’ ideas and express their own clearly and persuasively.

 

Major Works Covered

 

  • The House On Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
  • “Julius Caesar” by William Shakespeare
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

 

I reserve the right to mix these up in any way I find appealing.

 

 

Welcome to English 106.

 

Course Overview:  English 106 is a year long course that assists freshman students in the transition from junior high to high school by concentrating on critical thinking, effective writing, and reading skills necessary for success in multiple academic areas. The course will include a study of literature, primarily short stories, novels, drama, poetry, and informational texts. Students will study vocabulary and word analysis appropriate for their grade level. Writing, reading, and rhetorical skills will be reinforced through the examination of various reading materials, ranging from classics to contemporary literature to informative sources. Organizing and summarizing skills will be emphasized to help student succeed in writing across the high school curriculum. This course utilizes a variety of assessment formats, such as research projects, oral presentations, expository and narrative essays, and formal testing.

 

Big Ideas: Throughout the year students in English 106 classes will:

 

  • Incorporate and cite strong textual evidence to support analysis of text.
  • Study and practice elements of creative expression in order to recognize it in literature and add sophistication to their writing.
  • Explore world history in order to identify and understand the connection between culture/history in literature.
  • Recognize the components of character in order to better understand character development in literature.
  • Employ a variety of reading strategies and techniques in order to improve fluency and comprehension.
  • Engage in small group and partner activities to effectively build on others’ ideas and express their own clearly and persuasively.

 

Major Works Covered

 

  • Selected short stories
  • To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  • Greek mythology and selections from The Odyssey by Homer

 

I reserve the right to mix these up in any way I find appealing. 

We may occasionally view other curriculum-related movies or movie clips. Parent’s signature on this syllabus indicates permission for your student to view these movies.

 

The first few portions of each section will include note taking, as we have to understand the social and political climate behind each given piece of literature before we can accurately understand the text itself. Taking notes is required, and there will be points attributable to them.

 

Each novel or  section will culminate in a large scale test that will cover the text itself and the notes we took in class.  They will be divided into various sections which will give each of you the chance to do very well.

 

The purpose of this class is to help to refine the skills you have been working on up to this point.  We will be deeply analyzing the texts, so come prepared each day.

 

This is English class, which means there will be a substantial amount of reading, discussion, and writing. It is in your best interest to fully complete all given assignments.

 

My tests are not hard, my essays are not hard, my worksheets and in class work is not hard.  But I do expect you to fully engage with the material, and fully engage with the classroom environment. If you turn in your work, do your best, and genuinely participate, you will enjoy this class.

 

Materials required for this class everyday:

  • Pen or Pencil
  • Composition Notebook
  • Loose-leaf paper
  • 3 ring binder
  • Your binder should be divided into the following sections:
    • Section I: Current Units
    • Section II: Notes/Handouts
    • Section III: Returned Work

 

 

 Grading Scale:

A = 90 – 100% B = 80 – 89% C = 70 – 79% D = 60 – 69% F = < 60%

Grading Practices: Grades will be divided into the following two categories.

  • Performance (90%)
    • Assessments of learning (e.g., tests, quizzes, projects, labs, presentations, speeches, papers, essays)
  • Practice (10%)
    • Assessments for learning (e.g., daily homework, quizzes to gauge understanding)

Absenteeism: You must be in attendance in order to share your ideas. When you are absent, no matter what the reason, it is your responsibility to request assistance from us regarding missing work. When you are absent, you must complete the work within one day per excused absence.

 

Graded work: All formally graded work (homework, essays) must be typed or very neatly written in ink. All essays must follow the Modern Language Association (MLA) format. The appearance of the work you turn in must be neat and clean of wrinkles, stains and folds. Illegible work and papers without the proper identification will receive a zero.

Each assignment is a reflection of your progress in achieving the goals of the course. A grade is meant to reflect your level of mastery; assignments that are not turned in tell us nothing about your progress and knowledge. You must turn assignments in to earn a passing grade for the course.

Late work: Work will be accepted one day late with a 10% deduction. Assignments turned in two or more days late will receive a 50% penalty. You may use your late homework pass to turn in an assignment up to two days late without penalty.

Progress reports: Progress reports will be given to you periodically or are available upon request.

 

Retakes: Students may revise written compositions. In order to be eligible, the initial assignment must have been turned in on time, and the assessed copy with rubric must be returned. The work needs to be corrected and resubmitted one week after it is returned to the student. The grade will reflect the improvement

 

Academic Integrity/ Plagiarism: You are expected to turn in your own work. Plagiarism includes taking any information verbatim from any source, including the Internet, without giving proper credit to the author, or rearranging the order of words and/ or changing some words as written by the author and claiming the work as your own. If you use information from another source (including: internet, books, peers) you must cite that source using MLA format. If it is shown that you are using someone else’s work without giving them credit you will receive a zero and a parent/ guardian will be notified. If you let someone use your work, you will receive a zero. If you use an essay that is not your own work, you will be referred to the dean’s office.

 

Cell Phone Policy: Though you may have cell phones at school, you may not use them in this classroom.

·         Cell phones must be silenced and stored out of sight prior to entering the room.

·         Any use of a cell phone or electronic device in this classroom will result in disciplinary consequences. Violations include, but are not limited to, the following:

1) Checking the time

2) A phone ringing or vibrating

3) Text messaging (incoming or outgoing)

4) Use of camera/video features

5) Use of calculator and/or internet features

 

Library: Reading is a central focus of our English 116 class. We strive to foster an environment where reading is not only an academic responsibility, but an activity that can be done for pleasure. We have worked to establish a library for our classroom that includes a wide variety of genres as well as ability levels so that every student can find texts that appeal to them. The books in our classroom library are never assigned. They are checked out on a voluntary basis.

We are sensitive to having appropriate reading material in our classroom library. That said, what is considered “appropriate” may vary from one parent to another. Some parents do not mind their child reading Stephen King; other parents object to the horror genre. Please be aware that the selections in our classroom library, just like the public library, range from elementary-level to university-level reading material. We ask that you remain aware throughout the year to the books that your child has chosen to read and assist in gauging the appropriateness.

 

Extra Help: I will be available each day after school. You are encouraged to stay if you need some assistance.

 

Contact information:

ebecker@jsd117.org

My teacher web page will be updated weekly to reflect the assignments/activities of the upcoming week, as well as any other relevant information.